CPSS - The Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems

 Justin Paolini

The Functions of the Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems

The Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems (CPSS) was the former name of the Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructure (CPMI). Central banks from the G-10 formed the CPSS. Today, it consists of twenty-five members, with tri-annual meetings. Its primary function is setting global payment, clearing, and settlement standards. It aims to improve safety, increase efficiency, enhance transparency, and contribute to financial stability. The CPMI also provides a platform for central banks to collaborate, focused on monetary policy, financial oversight, and market operations.

The Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems Explained

The CPSS system, now CPMI, intends to improve global payment, clearing, and settlement standards by monitoring and analyzing risks. It also coordinates and cooperates with central banks and systematic financial institutions.

The CPMI BIS mandate also includes:

  • Risk identification to the global financial system
  • The sharing of analytics, research, and experiences in the payment, clearing, and settlement systems
  • Data on the performance of central bank oversight functions and services for a better overall understanding
  • The development of advice for central bank policies
  • Establishing and promoting global standards and recommendations on regulation and oversight of payment, clearing, and settlement systems
  • The implementation and monitoring of CPMI standards and recommendations by member and non-member entities
  • Supporting cross-border cooperation, including information sharing, crisis communication, and contingency planning for cross-border crisis management
  • Maintaining non-CPMI central banks relationships, sharing experiences and information, and promoting the implementation of CPMI standards and recommendations

The History of the Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems

The Swiss-based Bank of International Settlements (BIS), dating back to the 1930s, hosts the CPMI Secretariat, formerly the CPSS Secretariat. In 1990, the Global Economy Meeting (GEM) oversaw the formation of the CPSS, which consisted of G-10 central banks. It formed partnerships and working groups with non-CPSS members and slowly extended its field of interest as the global financial system grew in complexity and interdependency.

In 2014, the GEM voted to change the Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems to the Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructure to reflect more accurately on its day-to-day operations. The name change included changes to its charter and mandate.

Examples of What the CPMI (formerly CPSS) Does

The CPMI usually meets tri-annually, establishes working groups to address specific issues, for example, the 2010 Working Group on Repo Market Infrastructure or the 2016 Digital Innovations Working Group, and shares its findings with non-members.

One example of its standard-setting and policy work includes the 2012 publication “Principles for Financial Market Infrastructures (PFMI)” in cooperation with the International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO). CPMI and IOSCO members incorporated PFMI into their legal and regulatory frameworks.

CPMI and IOSCO also published the 2014 Recovery of Financial Market Infrastructures and the 2016 Guidance on Cyber Resilience for Financial Market Infrastructures reports.

The Legal Status of the CPMI

The CPMI has no legal, regulatory, or supranational authority. It functions closer to a think tank comprised of entities with enforcement powers, aiming to set standards, but relies on voluntary implementations.

CPSS Conclusion

The CPMI, formerly CPSS, strives to improve the global financial infrastructure via research, analytics, and working groups. It has no enforcement authority and relies on voluntary implementation and supervision of recommendations.

FAQs

What is a CPMI loan?

The CPMI cannot issue loans as it is neither a bank nor a financial institution.

What is the BIS Innovation Hub?

The BIS Innovation Hub identifies critical technology trends affecting central banks, develops goods to improve the global financial system, and offers a network for central bank experts on innovation.

 

 Justin Paolini

Justin Paolini helps traders succeed through 1-on-1 coaching at BuildingaTrader.com. He is also Head of Trader Development at FCI Markets UK. Justin has over 15 years of experience trading Forex of which 3 were spent as a Sales Trader and as a Broker. Previously, he was an analyst at 3CAnalysis.com, producing institutional grade directional calls. His market commentary has been published on FXRenew.com, Yahoo! Finanza, Trend Online, FX Street, OrderFlowtrading.com, and ForexTell.com. For the past 8 years, he has dedicated himself to helping others succeed, and has been a guest lecturer at the University of Ancona on Trading and Market Dynamics.

Justin holds a B.A. in Economics & Finance from UNIVPM, Ancona, and a Masters in Finance, Banking & Insurance.

Did you like what you read? Let us know what you think!

exclamation mark

Please make sure your comments are appropriate and that they do not promote services or products, political parties, campaign material or ballot propositions. Comments that contain abusive, vulgar, offensive, threatening or harassing language, or personal attacks of any kind will be deleted. Comments including inappropriate will also be removed.

0 User comments

exclamation mark

Please make sure your comments are appropriate and that they do not promote services or products, political parties, campaign material or ballot propositions. Comments that contain abusive, vulgar, offensive, threatening or harassing language, or personal attacks of any kind will be deleted. Comments including inappropriate will also be removed.

Read more
Add new comment
This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.